Tag Archives: Runica et Mediævalia

To Italy and back again

Been on a trip to Italy – that should be good for posts on archaeology and cultural history. Well, I’ve got some culture though the main purpose of the trip was another type of culture; wine. For the second time I’ve been at the European wine bloggers conference, this time around in Franciacorta. I’ll get back to you on that in the coming days, I’ve had time for some ruins but I also held a short speech on how to combine interests, in this case wine and archaeology.

 If you know your Tolkien you know the title I’ve paraphrased, when I got home I had several books waiting for me;

Påvel Nicklasson has written the bible on the beginning on Swedish archaeology in the book Att aldrig vandra vill – Johan Haquin Wallman. Sveriges förste arkeolog. (To never hike will – Johan Haquin Wallman. Swedens first archaeologist.) As the title says its an biography on the first archaeologist in Sweden, Johan Haquin Wallman (1792-1853). Though its not only a book on a man but also on the history of archaeology as a science and its birth in Sweden. I really look forward of reading this and will get back to you about it and Johan Haquin Wallman.

Secondly the annual archaeological journal Utskrift number 11 & 12 had arrived – lots of interesting articles on the archaeology in Halland a region in the southwest part of Sweden – these were sent to me to review on the blogg – many thanks to Kulturmiljö Halland.

Thirdly this years early Christmas present from the society Runica et Mediævalia. As always a bundle of joy:

  • Jan Rüdiger – Did Charlemagne know Carolingian kingship theory?
  • Olle Ferm & Erika Kihlman (eds) – Swedish students at the University of Vienna in the Middle Ages
  • Bero Magni de Ludosia – Sermones et Collationes. Sermons from the University of Vienna in the Mid-Fifteenth Century. (Edited and translated by Claes Gejrot & Erika Kihlman).

I also is working on Elin Fornanders dissertaion that is put forward at Stockholm University tomorrow.

 

Well, that’s whats on the bedstand the next coming days, weeks, months?

 

Magnus Reuterdahl


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Runica et Mediævalia 2010 editions

New books on my reading list, from Runica et Mediævalia:

Det senmedeltida Stockholm – en språklig och kulturell smältdegel (The late medieval Stockholm – a linguistic and cultural melting pot). Stefan Mähl. Sällskapet Runica et Mediævalia Lectiones 9, 2010.

Bebådelsebilder. Om bildbruk under medeltiden (Annunciation pictures. About use of pictures during the Middle Ages.). Mia Åkestam. Runica et Mediævalia Scripta mimora 19. 2010.

S:t Sigfrid besjungen. Celebremus karissimi, ett helgonofficium från 1200-talet (Songs on S:t Sigfrid. Celebremus karissimi, a saint officium from the 1200s). Edition och kommentarer av Ann-Marie Nilsson. Runica et Mediævalia Scripta maiora 6. 2010

Magnus Reuterdahl


Currently on the bedstand.

I’m a member of the society Runica et Mediævalia (link in Swedish). The Society was formed in 1990 and aims to promote research on runes and medieval languages (mainly Scandinavian), culture and society, primarily through the issuance of the publication series Runic et Mediævalia etc. As a member I get the publications every now and then as they are beeing published, last week two books arrived; The first is; Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige (The medieval writing culture in Sweden) – Inger Larsson [ed.], This is a book I’ll come back to in future post. The second one is Kung Magnus och hans smädesnamn Smek (King Magnus and his libel nick name Smek = caress, stroke, fondle or…) by Olle Ferm.

The last is the one I currently read, it concerns a factoid regarding king Magnus Eriksson libel nick name Smek, where the nick name has been interpret as proof king Magnus was homosexual. Magnus Eriksson was the Swedish king between 1319-1363. Among other things he got conned by the Danish king Valdemar Attedag and by being so lost the province Scania to Denmark and he was accused of being homosexual by Saint Birgitta of Vadstena and others. Due to the accusations an interpretation of the nick name Smek was made as meaning fondle, caress, stroke was made, in the meaning that he liked to fondle other men. Olle Ferm brings forth another interpretation where Smek rather has the meaning “someone who has been conned by flattery”, i.e. King Valdemar conned him out of Scania with flattery.

Olle Ferm has produced a kind of historic detective book that is a pleasant and interesting read, giving a background to the word Smek and how it’s been interpreted through the ages, but also on the political situation of the time as well as on history scholars and their work. Wheatear or not king Magnus was gay or not is not something the author studies in this work, at least not yet – I haven’t finished it yet. Evan though I haven’t finished it I can recommend this to those who are interested in the history and politics of medieval Sweden as well as to those who like the study of words and language.

Magnus Reuterdahl


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