Tag Archives: Halland

To Italy and back again

Been on a trip to Italy – that should be good for posts on archaeology and cultural history. Well, I’ve got some culture though the main purpose of the trip was another type of culture; wine. For the second time I’ve been at the European wine bloggers conference, this time around in Franciacorta. I’ll get back to you on that in the coming days, I’ve had time for some ruins but I also held a short speech on how to combine interests, in this case wine and archaeology.

 If you know your Tolkien you know the title I’ve paraphrased, when I got home I had several books waiting for me;

Påvel Nicklasson has written the bible on the beginning on Swedish archaeology in the book Att aldrig vandra vill – Johan Haquin Wallman. Sveriges förste arkeolog. (To never hike will – Johan Haquin Wallman. Swedens first archaeologist.) As the title says its an biography on the first archaeologist in Sweden, Johan Haquin Wallman (1792-1853). Though its not only a book on a man but also on the history of archaeology as a science and its birth in Sweden. I really look forward of reading this and will get back to you about it and Johan Haquin Wallman.

Secondly the annual archaeological journal Utskrift number 11 & 12 had arrived – lots of interesting articles on the archaeology in Halland a region in the southwest part of Sweden – these were sent to me to review on the blogg – many thanks to Kulturmiljö Halland.

Thirdly this years early Christmas present from the society Runica et Mediævalia. As always a bundle of joy:

  • Jan Rüdiger – Did Charlemagne know Carolingian kingship theory?
  • Olle Ferm & Erika Kihlman (eds) – Swedish students at the University of Vienna in the Middle Ages
  • Bero Magni de Ludosia – Sermones et Collationes. Sermons from the University of Vienna in the Mid-Fifteenth Century. (Edited and translated by Claes Gejrot & Erika Kihlman).

I also is working on Elin Fornanders dissertaion that is put forward at Stockholm University tomorrow.

 

Well, that’s whats on the bedstand the next coming days, weeks, months?

 

Magnus Reuterdahl



A nice surprise

Kodus to Leif Häggström for sending me a nice gift, in form a brand new issue of the Swedish archaeological journal Utskrift #10. It’s published by stiftelsen Hallands Länsmuseer, Kulturmiljö Halland (the Foundation Halland County Museums) on archaeology  in Halland county and nearby regions. All articles are written in Swedish.

I’ve yet to read this issue, as yet I’ve just skimmed through it. There are several interesting articles including Leif’s articles on Man and animal in Halland 500-1100 AD and Sheep and goat in archaeological records from Halland, Lennart Carlie’s Wood species analysis – a source of knowledge with several dimensions etc.

I’ll get back to you when as I read it.

 

Magnus Reuterdahl

 


Another day in the wild

The work continues outside of Halmstad, Halland County, in the southwest of Sweden. The area is perhaps not the most exiting if one wants to find ancient monuments, instead we’ve found several croft ruins and ruins of poor houses and of course the small fields surrounding them.

Today was a beautiful day, sunny, a light breeze and about 15-20 degrees Celsius. As I was walking over a small ridge scared the wits out of this elk (moose), as he ran away I managed to get a photo, though poorly.

They’re mighty animals, and I think I got as shocked as he or she, and fanatic to see in their own habitant, in the wild – though I kind of like to see them on plate as well.

Now it’s resting and mending for a new go tomorrow, I got a tender knee from slipping on wet root and having the fortune of landing on my knee just where a stone happened to be – it’s a bit swollen but should be fine after a few hours rest.

Magnus Reuterdahl


Dolmens Froboke type

This week the field season started with a survey in Bredaryd parish in Halland. As I’ve been sitting in the office for a few months the body is not quite ready for action – every limb feels sore after a few days of hiking in the country side – still it’s great to be outdoors again.

On the way to the survey I passed the grave field Froboke and took a couple of pictures. This grave field is perhaps most known for a fascinating type of burial monuments called Iron Age dolmens, which originally was called Fröböke dolmens after this site. The grave field is located in Bredary parish, Halland, a few miles from Halmstad.

Photo at the south part of the grave filed towards north

Photo from the middle part of the gravfield towards the south part

I’ve written about Iron Age dolmens before, here and here. In short Iron Age dolmens can be found on grave fields in the south west part of Sweden; in the west part of Smaland, in Halland and in the south west part of Vastra Gotaland. They are generally dated to ca 500 B.C. – 400 A.D. and only a few have been excavated. This type of burial monuments was first described in 1876 while the road next to the grave filed was built.

The north part of the grave field

The grave field at Froboke is quite small and consists of seven visible grave monuments; three Iron Age dolmens and four erected stones. The grave field has probably been larger but have been diminished over time due to agriculture and road works in historic and modern times. Two archaeological excavations have been carried out at the grave field in 1914 and 1933 – among the finds is a glass bead, cremated bones and pieces of quartz. The “complete” Iron Age dolmen just next to the road was restored in the end of the 19th century, it’s possible that some kind of excavation was carried out then as well.

The reconstructed Iron Age dolmen

Not all that chatch my eye is of cultural historic interest, like this spider’s web.

Next week I’ll be in Växjo in Kronobergs County doing more archaeological work.

Magnus Reuterdahl


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