A rune stone in need of TLC

When I was in Västergötland a few weeks ago I passed this rune stone (Vg 195, Tranemo 3:1). As it stands, without a information sign, it needs to be repainted. Aaccording to the National Heritage database of ancient monuments (FMIS) it was last done in 1979 – if so the paint has lasted well, but it’s beginning to be difficult to read the runes not only due to the lack of paint but also due to weathering. Repainting is not always the best solution as it in some cases it seems to have hasted the decline of the stone surface, and painted runes is not in itself necessary for the understanding of  the monument. In most cases I believe that an information sign, if good, is better. It can help to give a context for the monument – why was it made? Who made it? Who could read or write runes? What does the runes say?  How it can be interpreted etc.

Behind the rune stone is a small piece that seems to have been chipped off. According to the text in FMIS this has probably been done before the stone was made into a rune stone. I would rather guess that it’s been done during the process of making the rune stone as I don’t believe that the stone stood on that spot on beforehand but rather has been placed at that spot. If the chip was accidental or on purpose is on the other hand another question.

The inscription should be as follows, translated into English; “Assur placed this stone after (in memory of) Anunde, his brother”, the inscription is formed around a cross.

According to the Nordic rune text database the transcription is (was); asur * sati * stin * þani * anuta * bruþur * si

Part of the inscription is no longer readable due to damages, as fas as my transcription goes these runes a readable today;…asu…  …(a)ni* iftiR * anuta * bruþur * si.

In other words this rune stone is in need of some TLC.

Magnus Reuterdahl

About Magnus Reuterdahl

I am an archaeologist/Osteologist from Sweden. My main intrest lays in north Euorpean archaeology in, preferbly the prehistory of the late iron age and the neolithic periods. I've also got a strong intrest for Chinese archaeology, especially the neolithc Yangshao culture. I also write about cultural heritage and cultural history. Mitt namn är Magnus Reuterdahl, jag är arkeolog och osteolog och arbetar företrädesvis i Sverige även om jag gjort ett par vändor till Kina. På den här bloggen skriver jag om mitt yrke, om fornlämningar, kulturarv och kulturhistoria m m. View all posts by Magnus Reuterdahl

Comments are disabled.

%d bloggers like this: