Tag Archives: Sverige

Tycooning

Today I was elected to the Association Board of DIK, the Swedish union for academics working on Culture and Communication, for the next three years

It’s both inspiring and exiting to be part of the DIK’s Association Board and to get be part of an interesting group of people and to work with interesting issues.

DIKs styrelse 2013-2015.
Övre raden från vänster: Erik Palm, Magnus Reuterdahl, Sara Sivre, Mia Lindgren, Lars Aldemark. Främre raden från vänster: Susanna Wennerfeldt, Helena Leidebrant, Karin Linder, Lena Sundberg, Emili Rask, Anna-Stina Takala. Ej med på bild: Jimmy Mannung, Sara Wranne. Bild: DIK.se

Idag blev jag invald i DIKs förbundsstyrelse, där jag kommer att sitta de närmsta tre åren. Jag ser fram emot att få arbeta med ett gäng intressanta människor från andra branscher, sätta mig in i nya frågor och ta del av intressanta arbetspolitiska frågor.

Magnus Reuterdahl


A historic ”spy” report on Sweden

I currently read Lorenzo Magalottis book Sverige under år 1674 (Sweden during the year 1674 aka Relazione del rigno di Svezia nel 1674) published by Carl Magnus Stenbock 1912.

During the later part of he 19th century Elof Tegner found a handwritten report in Italian archives regarding Svecana. It was this one and one written by Alessandro Bichi regarding his relations withSweden during 1696.

Lorenzo Magalotti (1637-1712) was a count who travelled the north of Europe and came toSwedenin 1674. There are also several sketches from his journeys. He enteredSwedenin June in Scania coming fromCopenhagenand travelled north and left in September.

A picture of Skeppsholmen ans Skeppsbron (Ships-bridge) in Stockholm as seen fromk the southsouthwest.

I’ve just started to read this fascinating description which could best be described as kind of spy report combined with personal notes. Here are notes on the political system, both officially and comments on how it works in reality, here are notes on architecture, daily life, the army & navy, on forts, on military strength, on framing, economics etc etc. I’ll get back to this in a later post or posts.

As he travelled he saw small as well as bigger villages, communities and cities. I also guess he made a far amount of stops – there is no mention where this inn was situated but this is how the “McDonalds” of the 17th century in might have been.

Magnus Reuterdahl


Skokloster Abbey

A few days ago I wrote about a visit to Skokloster castle and published some photos, now it is time for some interior shots.

Sko church was built by the order of Cistercians as the nuns at Byarum in Smaland started to move to Uppland in the 13th century. It’s believed that work started ca 1230, ca 1280 is the inauguration of the high altar of the church, by then the nuns might have moved to Sko. As most medieval churches it has been added to, restored and changed over the centuries.

Skokloster kyrka interiör

Interior Skokloster Abbey

crucifix Skokloster kyrka

Crucifix, made of oak, mid-1200s.

Madonna, made of oak, the child’s head of hardwood, possible from Gotland, first quarter of the 1300s.

The Herman Wrangel monument in the grave Wrangelska choir. The sculpture is made by Daniel Anckermann (German) ca 1650.

Herman Wrangel golden armor

There are two artistic representations of the Battle of Gorzno in Skokloster Abbey, an oil painting and the stucco on the wall of the Wrangel tomb chapel.

The stucco is divided into a lower lot, where the battle scenes take place in a forest and river scenery, and a top where Swedish and Polish armies are seen in bird’s eye view, the Poles on the left and the Swedes on the right side. The stucco is based on a drawing preserved in the war archive, in Stockholm.

The information on the stucco is from an article in Fornvännen 1939 by Wilhelm Nisser; Daniel Anckermans stuckaturer i de Gyllenhemska och Wrangelska gravkoren (pdf in Swedish).

Magnus Reuterdahl


the Culture investigation part 2

logga-kultur

I am disappointed with the Culture investigation due to several factors, but most regarding the fact that it focuses on organizational aspects rather than on visions or practical aspects. Much of the result can be summed up by the suggestion that 24 authorities are to become three. Statements regarding this investigation are due in just 3 months, not much time to digest 900 pages and provide good comments. The plan is to kick this off in 2010.

Why the rush? Was super organisations really what we needed and/or wanted?

When confronted by the finance situation in the Cultural Heritage sector one can’t help but ask how the sector is to survive; as it slowly but surely has been dismantled for many years and according to plan this will continue.

In 2009 the Cultural sections of the County Administrative Board applied for ca 369 million sek (ca 36 million €) in appropriations. In the end 210 millions was granted i.e. a gap of 159 million or 43% less than was applied for. Now it’s not quite as bad as it looks. The applied money can be divided into two parts; money for basic activity and money for various project applications (which most often is sought from external partners such as museums via the Cultural sections of the County Administrative Boards). I would guess the latter part is ca 20% of the applied amount i.e. ca 74 million sek. A large proportion of these projects will never be realized neither will parts of the planned activities.

I feel that is a problem that there is such a big discrepancy between funds applied and approved as this shows that there is a great need for funding. Furthermore I believe it would be better for all parts if the museums and different organisiation where to apply directly to the National Heritage Board instead of making the extra step via the County Administrative Board.

In the beginning of this post I mentioned the dismantling of the cultural heritage sector (and for that matter many other government sectors), which have been lasting for several years. It is one thing if this was a clearly stated objective, against which the sector could respond to. As it is now the government do not to provide full compensation for price and wage developments, the 2008 ratio was approximately 0.8: 3. i.e. raising the allocation with 0.8% while prices and wages rose by about 3 percent is cut back with more 2,2 %. This combined with “market” rent for the premises occupied, which in many cases are rooms that may only be used for a single purpose, such as museums. The state gives with one hand takes it back with the other. The effect is that they slowly but surely dismantle the sector without adding special saving requirements, read more about it here (article in Swedish).

Unfortunately it feels like it doesn’t matter wheatear we have a right or left government, when none of them seems to have an ideological or visionary interest in these issues. The system was introduced by the Social democrats and is being retained by the non socialist government of today, i.e. the dismantling has been in effect for more than 15 years. And during this 15 years Sweden has been doing good financially. I don’t know if the effect has been 2 %/ year but either way it is a lot of money and services lost.  Now it must be said that it is in principle applicable to cultural policy as a whole and not only those related to cultural heritage.

As I see it most of the ideas that is brought forth in this investigation is yesterdays news, it feels old and dusty and do not set a vision for either today or tomorrow. Why place the Cultural heritage sector together with art and exhibits when most work we do is in a higher degree connected with issues regarding planning, development, environmental protection, landscape etc.

I hope that this proposal does not go through as it stands today.

Now I’ve sulked long enough on this, it is time for something more uplifting and less domestic; next post is on Osteology, and that’s a promise!

 

Magnus Reuterdahl


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